New research links dark circles to health problems

By LINDSAY BERMAN Associated PressLight circles and light switches are popular household light fixtures, but new research suggests that their exposure can damage the eyes.

Researchers in Sweden analyzed eye health data from more than 1,000 people to find that people with dark circles had higher rates of developing retinal degeneration and chronic retinal disease, which are the most common causes of eye disease in adults.

The study also found that people who wore light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs had higher risk of developing dark circles and chronic eye disease.

LED bulbs, which use a small amount of electricity to light a device, can produce far more light than incandescent bulbs, or fluorescent bulbs, and are considered safe.

But they emit harmful light that can cause damage to the retina and other tissues in the eye.

The study authors say it’s not clear if the light emitted by LED bulbs can cause health problems like retinal damage, but they say it should be considered a potential risk factor.

A light-purifying material called an LED light switch covers the bulb, which makes it more difficult for the light to enter the eye, and makes it easier for light to pass through the retina, which helps prevent the formation of retinal dark circles, or “black spots,” that cause the eye to gradually lose its brightness.

People who have dark circles have lower levels of the eye’s protective pigment melanin.

If dark circles develop, they can lead to macular degeneration, blindness and other eye conditions.

People with darker eyes also have a higher risk for other eye diseases, such as macular detachment, or retinal detachment, the researchers said.

The researchers said the results suggest that the use of LED lights is safe, but that there may be risks to the public that must be considered in light bulbs’ safety guidelines.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said the agency is working to determine whether LED lighting can cause any health effects, including whether the lighting can be used safely for people with diabetes.

The agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the study.

A report published last year by researchers at the University of California at San Francisco suggested that LED lighting may not be safe for people whose eyes are dark.

That study said that people should not be using light bulbs in the home for the duration of their lives because the light can be harmful to the eyes, particularly for people who have had retinal surgery or are developing retinopathy, a disease of the blood vessels that causes blindness.

The authors of that study said it was difficult to determine how much risk the LED lights posed to the health of people with darker-eyed people because they didn’t collect data on the number of times people used them or how long they used them.

The researchers didn’t include data from people who had never used light bulbs, such the elderly or people who didn’t wear masks.