When the lights go out: How the UK’s new laws will affect us

When the headlights go out in your car, it’s no longer the time to run for the bathroom or check your email.

That’s because the UK is to change its laws to allow for the lighting of cars and other public places in a way that is consistent with the new science behind LED lights.

Under the UK government’s plan, which is to go into effect from October 2018, cars will be allowed to have one “red light” when a red light is illuminated, but only one “blue light”.

The change is designed to allow more cars to operate safely in areas where it is hard to see the light.

It means that lights that are red or amber when lit are no longer “safe”.

The Department of Transport has said it will take into account the impact of changing the way lights are used.

The changes to the UK lighting laws are part of a wider change to make the UK more efficient, effective and safer, in a bid to cut carbon emissions.

The Department of Health said the changes to lighting laws, which were announced on Friday, would make the country “more effective, safer and efficient”.

In the first phase of the plan, vehicles will be able to run lights only when they are in a safe position.

Under the plan cars will only be allowed one red light at any one time, and a blue light will only light up if a red or blue light is in the same position.

The plan is to allow a wider range of lights to be used, from a single “red” light to a “blue” light, to be “safer and more efficient”.

There will be no restrictions on the size of lights or how much they can illuminate, and they will be permitted to be mounted on other cars, but the changes are designed to be consistent with new scientific research that shows the effectiveness of LEDs and the way that they light up objects in real-time.

“Red lights have been used for hundreds of years to light up houses, businesses, roads and public spaces, but LEDs have proven to be much safer and much more efficient at producing a brighter, more colourful light,” said Richard Lloyd, the chief executive of the British Association for Light-Emitting Diode (BLEED).

“We’re also pleased that the new rules will make the lights safer and more effective for both road users and those driving cars.”

“The government will continue to work with manufacturers to develop safe and efficient lighting for our roads,” he added.

The new rules are part, however, of a broader government commitment to help the economy recover from the Brexit vote in June, which saw Britain leave the European Union.

The UK government announced that it would not provide any extra funding to the EU to help companies, industries and individuals cope with the economic fallout.

Under its new rules, businesses and the public sector will be exempt from having to pay to retrofit lighting.

The UK has been a net exporter of energy for the past two decades, and its economy has grown more than 15 per cent since the referendum.